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5 Tips that Every Solo Cruiser Should Know 

Are you a solo traveller? If you answered, ‘Yes!’ then cruising could be the perfect way to see the world and all it has to offer.

The thought of going on holiday alone can be quite a daunting prospect if you’re someone who is used to travelling with others.

The great thing about a cruise is that it’s all planned in advance and arranged for you. This includes different dining options, onboard activities, and excursions.

All you need to do is decide what you want to eat and what activities you want to get involved with.

Below we’ve outlined some of the ways to make the most of your solo cruise holiday…

Get on Social Media Beforehand

The improvement of on-board Wi-Fi has no doubt had an impact on solo cruising. It means that you can easily stay in touch with friends and family wherever you are in the world.

Woman on a laptop with Facebook on the screen

As well as this, the likes of Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are also making solo travel a lot more sociable. There are opportunities to meet like-minded individuals, through private groups, so you’ve already got new friends when you board, as well as overcoming any concerns you may have before you travel.

Cosy Single Cabin

The demand to accommodate the Solo Traveller has forced the major cruise providers to become more competitive.  It's now well within thier interests to improve the experiene while staying within an afforable price. After all, a safe & friendly cruise ship is the ideal enviroment for the solo traveller. 

One of the Solo Cabins on Britannia Cruise Ship

Major cruise lines such as Celebrity, Cunard, Fred. Olsen, P&O, Saga and Royal Caribbean are offering purpose-made single cabins that are cosy without being cramped. It’s no surprise that solo cruise cabins are in high demand.

In fact, both Fred Olsen and Saga have been nominated as finalists for the prestigious Wave Award “Best For Solo Traveller."

Dining in Style

Many people find the idea of eating alone hard to overcome. It can actually be the ideal time to interact with others as everyone is a similar situation. Some ships will offer fixed dining where you’ll be sitting on a table with the same guests each night, a perfect opportunity forge some lasting friendships. Why not try asking to be placed on the biggest table?

A big dining room on Cruise Ship during service

It might be the case that as you partake in different activities and walk around the ship, the people you converse will ask you to dine with them. Many people who travel in groups still love to meet new people. This is a great way to share experiences with other travellers.

Remember, cruising solo isn’t just for singles!

Solo cruising isn’t just for those who are single. Cruise ships are full of people who just want to holiday without their partner. It’s a great place to get some personal space and time away from everyday pressures.

According to Andy Harmer, UK & Ireland director of the Cruise Lines Internation Association, there has been more Google searches for ‘solo travel’ than ever before. 

Products to assist with Independence

Not all Solo travellers are fit and able, some may have the desire to cruise but are fearful that as the ships are increasing in size, they wont be able to cope as well as usual. Mobility at Sea have the answer - many of our Solo clients benefit from hiring a folding electric wheelchair. These are easy to store in the cabin when not in use but there when you need it for excursions or use on board, allowing you to experience more and get more out of your holiday.

If you need any mobility equipment for a solo cruise, then we can help. Our friendly team can help you to cruise in comfort by providing a wide range of equipment. For more information call 0800 328 1699 or visit our website today!


Concerns about travelling to the Ports?

Don’t worry, we can introduce you to a company that offers a unique Home to Holiday transfer service, personalised so you arrive in safety and comfort without the usual worries.

 


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